Spring 2024 Honors Discovery Courses (2024)

AMST 444C (H01) - PICTURING AMERICA: THE ARTS & SOCIAL CHANGE
CRN:56877

How has the camera shaped the way we see ourselves, and the world around us? How are photographers and writers--sometimes self-consciously and sometimes unwittingly affected by the definitions of what it means to be an American? What does something American look like? In this class, we'll try to answer that question in all its complexity by looking at both photographic and written documents, from the late nineteenth century, when photography was a relatively new technology, to the present. How can we "read" a photograph? What kinds of ethical and aesthetic concerns are involved in recording "reality?" What is the relationship between art and social concerns? How do photographs tell stories, and with what consequences?

Instructor Approval Required. Contact Instructor for permission then register through Webcat.
Attributes:Writing Intensive Course, Inquiry (Discovery), Honors course, Fine&PerformingArts(Discovery)
Instructor: Lisa MacFarlane

MW 2:10pm - 3:30pm

ANTH 500 (HD0) - PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF THE WORLD
CRN:56269

Explores cultures and peoples from specific geographic regions of the world. Broadly considers social, gendered, economic, and political changes in ecological and historical context, focusing on precolonial, colonial, and contemporary societies and globalization. Sections: A. North America, B. Latin America, C. Middle East and North Africa, D. Sub-Saharan Africa, E. Southeast Asia. May be repeated barring duplication of subject.

Attributes:World Cultures(Discovery), Honors course
Instructors:Svetlana Peshkova

TR 9:40am - 11:00am

BIOL 412H (01) - HONORS/INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY: EVOLUTION, BIODIVERSITY, AND ECOLOGY LABORATORY
CRN:50292
Special Fees:$38.00

Evolution is the paradigm through which we understand Biology. This course will introduce students to evolutionary concepts that underlie the tremendous biodiversity present on Earth, and explore the ecological interactions that occur among individuals and species. Indoor and outdoor lab activities. Required for majors in the biological sciences. Students are not permitted to enroll in BIOL 411 and BIOL 412 in the same semester. Lab.

Attributes:Inquiry (Discovery), Honors course, Discovery Lab Course, Biological Science(Discovery)
Instructors:Leslie Curren
TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm

BIOL 412H (02) - HONORS/INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY: EVOLUTION, BIODIVERSITY, AND ECOLOGY LABORATORY
CRN:51353
Special Fees:$38.00

Evolution is the paradigm through which we understand Biology. This course will introduce students to evolutionary concepts that underlie the tremendous biodiversity present on Earth, and explore the ecological interactions that occur among individuals and species. Indoor and outdoor lab activities. Required for majors in the biological sciences. Students are not permitted to enroll in BIOL 411 and BIOL 412 in the same semester. Lab.

Attributes:Inquiry (Discovery), Honors course, Discovery Lab Course, Biological Science(Discovery)
Instructors:Laura Kloepper
MWF 11:10am - 12:00pm

BIOL 444B (H01) - CURRENT CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES IN BIOLOGY
CRN:51757

An inquiry into current controversial issues in biology and their scientific and technical bases, but with an emphasis on exploring the various perspectives or beliefs related to each topic and their social and environmental implications.

Attributes:Inquiry (Discovery), Honors course, Biological Science(Discovery)
Instructors:Thomas Foxall
TR 9:40am - 11:00am

CHEM 404H (01) - HONORS/GENERAL CHEMISTRY II
CRN:53571

Fundamental laws and concepts applied to nonmetals, metals, and their compounds. For students who plan to take further chemistry courses. Previous chemistry recommended. Knowledge of algebra, exponentials, and logarithms required. Required for chemistry majors. Lab. Honors course is designed for students who have enrolled in the honors degree program. Lab. Cannot be taken for credit if credit received for CHEM 402.

Prerequisite(s):CHEM 403
Attributes:Physical Science(Discovery), Honors course, Discovery Lab Course

Instructors:Katharine Winans

MWF 8:10am - 9:00a

CHEM 404H (02) - HONORS/GENERAL CHEMISTRY II
CRN:53572

Fundamental laws and concepts applied to nonmetals, metals, and their compounds. For students who plan to take further chemistry courses. Previous chemistry recommended. Knowledge of algebra, exponentials, and logarithms required. Required for chemistry majors. Lab. Honors course is designed for students who have enrolled in the honors degree program. Lab. Cannot be taken for credit if credit received for CHEM 402.

Prerequisite(s):CHEM 403
Attributes:Physical Science(Discovery), Honors course, Discovery Lab Course

Instructors:Katharine Winans
MWF 10:10am - 11:00am

CHEM 404H (03) - HONORS/GENERAL CHEMISTRY II
CRN:53573

Fundamental laws and concepts applied to nonmetals, metals, and their compounds. For students who plan to take further chemistry courses. Previous chemistry recommended. Knowledge of algebra, exponentials, and logarithms required. Required for chemistry majors. Lab. Honors course is designed for students who have enrolled in the honors degree program. Lab. Cannot be taken for credit if credit received for CHEM 402.

Prerequisite(s):CHEM 403
Attributes:
Physical Science(Discovery), Honors course, Discovery Lab Course

Instructors:
Stacey Hughes
TR 8:10am - 9:30a
m

CHEM 404H (L01) - HONORS/GENERAL CHEMISTRY II
CRN:50302
Special Fees:$40.00

Fundamental laws and concepts applied to nonmetals, metals, and their compounds. For students who plan to take further chemistry courses. Previous chemistry recommended. Knowledge of algebra, exponentials, and logarithms required. Required for chemistry majors. Lab. Honors course is designed for students who have enrolled in the honors degree program. Lab. Cannot be taken for credit if credit received for CHEM 402.

Prerequisite(s):CHEM 403
Only listed majors in section:CHEMISTRY (BA),CHEMISTRY (BS)

Attributes:Physical Science(Discovery), Honors course, Discovery Lab Course
Instructors:Ian Konen
W 2:10pm - 5:00pm

CHEM 404H (L02) - HONORS/GENERAL CHEMISTRY II
CRN:50698
Special Fees:$40.00

Fundamental laws and concepts applied to nonmetals, metals, and their compounds. For students who plan to take further chemistry courses. Previous chemistry recommended. Knowledge of algebra, exponentials, and logarithms required. Required for chemistry majors. Lab. Honors course is designed for students who have enrolled in the honors degree program. Lab. Cannot be taken for credit if credit received for CHEM 402.

Prerequisite(s):CHEM 403
Attributes:Physical Science(Discovery), Honors course, Discovery Lab Course

Instructors:Ian Konen

W 6:10pm - 9:00pm

CMN 529 (H01) - DATA FOR SALE: CAPITALISM AND THE SURVEILLANCE ECONOMY
CRN:56275

Surveillance, the practice of tracking and recording information about people, is central to modern capitalist societies. Capitalists rely on surveillance systems to supervise workers and managers, identify customer markets, keep accounts, and calculate the risk of investments and innovations. While such practices can increase profits, they also pose threats for privacy and individual freedom. This course explores the relationship between capitalism and surveillance, and considers the role of surveillance as a mode of economic world-building and social control in the past and present.

Attributes:Honors course, Environment,Tech&Society(Disc)
Instructors:Josh Lauer
TR 11:10am - 12:30pm

ECON 401H (01) - HONORS/PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS (MACRO)
CRN:51518

Basic functions of the United States economy viewed as a whole; policies designed to affect its performance. Economic scarcity, supply and demand, the causes of unemployment and inflation, the nature of money and monetary policy, the impact of government taxation and spending, the federal debt, and international money matters. ECON 401A emphasizes applications to the international economy. ECON 401H is open to students in the Honors Program.

Attributes:Social Science (Discovery), Inquiry (Discovery), Honors course
Instructors:Marco Vincenzi
TR 9:40am - 11:00am

ENGL 401H (02) - HONORS/FIRST-YEAR WRITING
CRN:56481

Training to write more skillfully and to read with more appreciation and discernment. Frequent individual conferences for every student.

Instructor Approval Required. Contact Instructor for permission then register through Webcat.

Attributes:Writing Skills(Discovery), Writing Intensive Course, Honors course
Instructors:Florianne Jimenez

TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm

ENGL 440A (H01) - ON RACE IN CULTURE AND SOCIETY
CRN:54152

Of our special concern will be the claim that race is a culturally or socially, not biologically, constructed category. The reading list will include literary texts (Toni Morrison's "Recitatif"), works of African American comedians (Bill Cosby, Richard Pryor, Eddie Murphy, etc.), philosophical texts (Immanuel Kant, W.E.B. DuBois, K.A. Appiah, etc.) as well as some legal documents (recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions concerning affirmative action). We will also do two case studies, one on the name of Redskins and one the Whiteness Project. The general goal of the course is to improve the student's ability to speak and think critically about race and race relations in the U.S.

Attributes:Writing Intensive Course, Humanities(Disc), Honors course
Instructors:Petar Ramadanovic

TR 11:10am - 12:30pm

ENGL 440B (H01) - HONORS/SEEING IS BELIEVING: HOW THE COPERNICAN REVOLUTION CHANGED THE WAY WE SEE OURSELVES
CRN:56878

This course explores the various ways that scientists, philosophers, poets, novelists, and literary theorists have tried to reconcile what we see (or think we see) with what we know (or think we know), from the ancient past to the 21st century. Our special focus will be on how the Copernican Revolution prompted a wholesale reevaluation of perception and knowledge. We will explore how writers, artists musicians, and philosophers embraced or lamented the enormous cultural and psychological changes that the Copernican evolution helped to introduce. We also will investigate how these changes continue to shape our worldview in the 21st-century.

Attributes:Humanities(Disc), Honors course
Instructors:Paul Robertson

MWF 10:10am - 11:00am

ESCI 444A (H01) - Philosophy of Earth Science
CRN: 56653

Course provides an introduction to the discipline of Philosophy of Science, but from an Earth Science perspective. Considers various philosophical perspectives on the nature of science and scientific progress, drawing from works by thinkers such as Aristotle, Popper, Kuhn and Lakatos. Particular attention is given to the following questions: What is scientific knowledge? Is the acquisition of scientific knowledge a rational process? And, what makes some scientific discoveries "revolutionary"? These questions are considered using examples from the history of scientific progress in the Earth Sciences, focusing on groundbreaking discoveries such as the age of the earth, the evolution of organisms as observed in the fossil record, sea-floor spreading, and modern-day global warming.

Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery), Honors course, Environment,Tech&Society(Disc)
Instructors: Rosemarie Came
TR 9:40am - 11:00am

HIST 440J (01) - CAPITALISM AND INEQUALITY IN WORLD HISTORY
CRN: 57049

This course introduces students to the causes of wealth inequality in the broadest possible variety of well-documented societies throughout world history, especially how capitalism causes and increases the gap between rich and poor. Ancient Greece, Rome, and China will be studied in depth, culminating in Industrial Capitalism from nineteenth-century Britain to twenty-first century US. State solutions to recurring patterns of free market profit-maximization (debt forgiveness, taxation, wealth distribution) are explored from ancient Mesopotamia to today. Cannot earn credit if credit received for HIST 690 "Rich vs. Poor: Class Welfare in World History".

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Discovery), Honors course
Instructors: Michael Leese
TR 11:10am - 12:30pm

PHIL 424H (01) - Honors/The Future of Humanity: Science, Technology, and Society
CRN: 53885

Consideration of the impacts of science and technology on humanity from a philosophical perspective. Topics often include genetic engineering, automated labor, advanced weaponry, artificial intelligence, social media and data extraction, space exploration, alien contact, virtual realities, transhumanism, and the future of humanity as an interplanetary species.

Attributes: Honors course, Environment,Tech&Society(Disc)
Instructors: Nicholas Smith
MW 11:10am - 12:30p

PHIL 440C (H01) - Honors/The Copernican Lens: Finding a Place for Humanity
CRN: 53018

How do humans fit into the cosmos? Once, we thought we were central players; most human societies believed they played a starring role, second only to the gods. Developments in the sciences have led modern humanity to a far more modest view: our existence is full of contingency and without cosmic significance. Humanity's self-conception is now recognized to be deeply culturally conditioned: is an objective view of humanity's place even possible?

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course, World Cultures(Discovery), Honors course
Instructors: Subrena Smith
MWF 10:10am - 11:00am

PHYS 408H (S01) - Honors/General Physics II
CRN: 50540
Special Fees: $15.00

Introductory course emphasizing waves, sound, heat, electricity and magnetism. Recommended for students specializing in science and engineering. The honors version covers the same material as the traditional lecture course, but with three two-hour classes per week, most of which is spent working on activities in groups (rather than lecture). Students in the Honors section must be co-enrolled in MATH 426H so that strong connections can be made between math and physics. 408H students work in groups in every class meeting. Students in this version do not register for a recitation or lab, since these activities are integrated into the regular class meetings. Lab.

Department Approval Required. Contact Academic Department for permission then register through Webcat.
Prerequisite(s): PHYS 407H and MATH 425H
Co-Requisite: MATH 426H
Attributes: Physical Science(Discovery), Honors course, Discovery Lab Course
Instructors: TBD
TR 3:40pm - 5:30pm

PHYS 440A (H01) - Hon/Searching for Our Place in the Universe: Foundation and Limits of Certainty in Physical Science
CRN: 53110

We explore models of the universe and our place in it. We discuss the foundation of ideas about motion on Earth and in space, as well as the history of modern physics and astronomy, which have changed how we understand space and time. We consider the sources and limitations of human knowledge concerning the origin of the universe, the mystery of the origin of life and evidence that our description of reality is incomplete.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course, Physical Science(Discovery), Honors course
Instructors: TBD

MWF 10:10am - 11:00am

SUST 401 (H01) - Exploring Sustainability
CRN: 55684

This interdisciplinary course is focused on discovering what sustainability means, understanding the challenges, and exploring transformative solutions. We explore the concept of sustainability and the three intersecting dimensions of environmental, social, and economic well-being. We learn about systems and explore specific sustainability challenges. Learning in this course is active and participatory. We also explore the role of personal and collective action and how we each can play a role in building a more sustainable society.

Attributes: Honors course, Environment,Tech&Society(Disc)
Instructors: Erin Hale
TR 11:10am - 12:30pm

Spring 2024 Honors Discovery Courses (2024)

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